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Fall Teas

Fall TeasWhile the weather may say otherwise, the calendar says Summer is over and it’s time for Fall Teas. You’ll now find two yummy fall favorites from the Republic of Tea here at Incahoots.

Pumpkin Spice
Rich and full-bodied, this premium black tea is flavorful with zesty spice notes enveloping a sweet pumpkin core. Reminiscent of freshly baked pumpkin muffins.

Apple Cider
Sweet African rooibos is the ideal base for smooth caramel and crisp apple flavors. This pleasing caffeine-free blend is wonderful as a dessert tea. Enjoy with a splash of warm milk.

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The Ribbon Plant

Homalocladium

No matter how long you’ve been around plants, there’s always something new to discover. Here’s another unusual plant that arrived this week:

The Ribbon Plant – also known as Ribbon Bush, Centipede Plant or even (as likely named by some kid in high school biology class) Tapeworm Plant.

Related to rhubarb and buckwheat, it’s placed in the shrub category and is also listed as a succulent. Around here, it will grow 3 to 4 feet tall, but in warmer climates can reach 10 feet.

This particular plant came in with the Homalocladium Platycladum name attached, but you’ll also find it listed under a variety of other names which are pretty much unpronounceable as well. Muehlenbeckia platyclados appears to be the most promisingly accurate of the lot.

It’s an easy care plant – grow it in sun to part shade with rich soil with good drainage. It can handle a light frost, but it’s not hardy here, so you might want to grow it in a container that can be brought in over the winter.

Grow this for the unusual form. What you see in the picture are stems. The plant does make small leaves, but they only appear occasionally on the new growth. The segmented stems and are flat, smooth and durable. They branch out and weave their way up eerily, forming a tall, bushy mass of ribbons. And when grown in bright light, it will produce tiny white flowers and attractive, but just as tiny, red fruit.

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Carnivorous Plants!

Last weekend I went up to a beautiful carnivorous plant nursery with my parents, Janet and Brian (you may know them as the owners of Incahoots), and got to view all of the amazing different carnivorous plants they had for sale. This amazing place is called Sarracenia Northwest, and if you go to their website you can sign up for a time to go visit as well. They had many gorgeous displays of the different types of plants they had, as well as a few very large tillansias which made me very happy. Here’s a little photo gallery of some of the displays and such that we viewed while there:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would like to check out our brand new selection of carnivorous plants, they are displayed outside, in front of the garden shed. We would be happy to show you where they are. I hope you come down and look at them, and maybe even take one home with you!

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Waiting until January to buy a new calendar is SO last year!

 

Calendars

Calendars are not only a great way to remember what day it is, but also a clever way to cover unsightly holes in your wall! Whatever your needs, our racks are overflowing with a fantastic assortment of date-filled schedule keepers. If you like that satisfying “rip!” of revealing the new page of a daily desk calendar or prefer the long-term joy of plotting the entire year one month at a time, you will find what you need here at Incahoots. The sixteen month options start with September – so hurry in for maximum enjoyment (and best selection).

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An Update

Tiles

Since we were nearing the completion of our makeover project, we took advantage of the Labor Day weekend to tile the restroom floor here at Incahoots (that’s right, business owners really know how to celebrate a holiday!) And on Sundaywhile waiting for the mortar to dry, we took a trip over to Sarracenia Northwest in Eagle Creek to see their extensive collection of carnivorous plants. You may be interested to know that as of a couple weeks ago, we have had a selection of carnivorous plants available and we figured we should spend a little time learning more about them.

Rain will be writing an in depth article about these fascinating plants and I’ll share that with you when it’s finished, but for now, I’ll leave you with a bit of plant poetry by Andrea.

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Tea of the Week: Earl Greyer Vanilla

Sorry for the absence in these weekly articles; I got caught up in marching band camp and getting ready for going back to school for my final year. The posts will be back to the regular schedule of Tea of the Week on Tuesday and the Plant of the Week on Thursday, but for this week you get the tea on Thursday!

I have selected one of our newer teas for this week’s Tea of the Week: Earl Greyer Vanilla. This tea is the next step up, combining the elements of all of its similar teas, Earl Grey, Earl Greyer, and Cream Earl Grey, which we also carry, and creating a new delicious tea. It has the deep black tea flavor of Earl Greyer with the vanilla element of Cream Earl Grey. I think it is my favorite of the bunch, because both the black tea and vanilla flavors are strong, but don’t overshadow each other. It is the perfect balance, and is exceptionally delicious.

If you would like to try Earl Greyer Vanilla for yourself we will happily brew you either a cup or a pot of this tea down here at the store. You can also purchase a tin of it if you love it. Hope to see you soon!

 

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New card line is both local and LOVE-ly

 

Mosaic

Printed in Redmond, Oregon by Collage Greetings, MOSAIC features independent artists from around the world. The distinctive look of each card feels personal with messages that are easy to express to your favorite people. You will find several options in both the Birthday and Love sections of the card area. Check them out next time you are in and pick up a half-dozen or so.

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New Air Plants!

Spanish Moss
With the warm summer we’ve been having, these Spanish moss plants are feeling right at home.

You’ll love these new arrivals in the Air Plant category.

Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) is an epiphyte (a rootless plant which hangs from the branches of a tree but gets no food or water from the host tree). The stem surfaces are covered with scales which absorb water and nutrients from the air and rain. For most of us, it doesn’t rain inside our homes, so when you grow them indoors, just mist them with water.

As I was doing a little research about these plants I discovered that Spanish moss was once commercially harvested for use as a stuffing (about 20 million pounds were used in 1937 for stuffing car seats, mattresses and furniture) and as packing material. It was also used for floor mats, insulation and mulch. These days its uses are much more restricted and it’s generally only used in arts and crafts, and floral arrangements. We tend to use our local types of moss with European basket arrangements, but the grayish color of Spanish Moss sometimes is just the thing.

Strangely enough, in all my research I found no mention of the most popular use for this plant: holding it to your chin and pretending you’re an old man.

P.S. A fresh batch of vegetable starts have just arrived (most are organic). You may be happily harvesting plenty of produce, but adding Kale, Broccoli, Cabbage, and Lettuce to your garden now will keep your harvest going when other plants are done.

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Tea of the Week: Chai

Last night I was hanging out with a group of friends to celebrate a birthday and we went out to Indian food which made me realize that I still haven’t featured one of my favorite teas, Chai. Chai, which simply translates as “tea”, is the staple tea in Indian culture. Chai is a spiced milk tea usually made from a combination of rich black tea, milk, various spices, and a sweetener. The most common spices used in Chai are cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and pepper, however, it can vary from region to region and household to household. A way to drink Chai that has developed recently is the Chai Latte, which contains the same components as traditional Chai but with a more modern twist. We have three different kinds of Chai for sale in bulk here at the store: Chai, 500 Mile Chai, and Red Bush Chai.

Our Chai is the most traditional blend we have, incorporating many of the common spices such as cinnamon, cardamom, and pepper. It is an all natural blend of lightly sweetened black tea and earthy spices. Milk can be added to achieve the traditional taste. You can buy this tea in bulk for $26 a pound.

Our 500 Mile Chai is a Tao of Tea blend, made from organic black tea, ginger, cloves, cardamom, and cinnamon. The name of this tea originates from the many late night truck drivers stopping at small Chai stands and asking for really strong, sweet Chai to help them drive long distances. You can buy this tea in bulk for $32 a pound

Finally, we have Red Bush Chai. This Chai strays a bit away from the traditional blend in that it uses caffeine free Rooibus ‘red bush tea’ from South Africa instead of the traditional black tea. This red bush tea is blended with cinnamon, spearmint, cloves and cardamom to create a full-bodied, slightly spicy flavor that is both cooling and sweet. You can buy this tea in bulk for $32 a pound.

If any of these variations of Chai have spiked your interest and you would like to give them a try, we will happily brew up a pot for you here at the store. We can also make you a Chai Latte if you are craving one of those (I know I always am). Hope to see you down here soon!